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Hardeep Matharu, Byline Times Editor on Speaking Truth to Power

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Hardeep Matharu, editor of Byline Times speaks to Mo Kanjilal about her career journey, why the Byline Times was needed to speak truth to power in the face of the establishment media.

We learn Hardeeps thoughts on minorities in the media, online abuse, and the importance of providing a platform for wide-ranging voices to be heard so people can access and share the truth.

Find out more about the Byline Times here: https://bylinetimes.com/
Follow Hardeep Matharu on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Hardeep_Matharu

Find out more about Watch This Sp_ce and the Reimagination At Work podcast here: https://www.watchthisspace.uk/
Follow Mo on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/Mo_Kanjilal
Follow Watch This Sp_ce here: https://twitter.com/Watchthisspce

Don't forget to like and subscribe to support our messages of diversity and inclusion and never miss any of 'em! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeY0nmdJ1LsB_NWSJAdxaMw
 

Hi and welcome to the reimagination atwork goodcast from watch this space. This is the podcast where we ask you tochallenge your assumptions and we talk about interesting subjects and oftenhave different guests on the show with us, and today I'm absolutely delightedto be joined by harding with the room, who is editor of the byline times hard.Even I have been trying to meet since January. I think so wee STARC talkingon tritter, there's an absolute clea. Actually me Onzam and hopefully one dayin person. So thank you so much hard in for joining us. Thank you for having me Weah, really Wak to finally talk to youand it's Le to start with, can you just tell us about you, your career andabout byline times and whyr? It started yes, so I got into Jomnism at the startaround two thousand and twelve. So I had graduated with a law degree, and Ihad had this plan to join the legal profession and very muchthat was all sort of set out in my mind when I got to university, but thenhaving done a degree which which I really quite enjoyed, I just realizedthat sort of Lal was interesting because it was allabout sort of you know: t Ese, these black owhitesort of rules and regulations and pillars which ultimately governs humanbehavior, which is completely gray. And so what I realized is that I wanted toexplore the grain and expose society in a much wider sense and ask questionsand that sort of thing. So, having graduated, I ended up doing a Jonsondiploma at Joneson School. So I did an NCTJ which was for six months and learnhow to write shorthand and all the basial reporting skills, which wasgreat fun and really useful. And then I actually started as a training reporter on a local title. So it's called theXand Guardian, which was part of the Southondon Guardian series. I note thatit's a papler which doesn't now exist in its own right. It was it's a news,Quest News, quest, title and yeah. I coveredthe AR at some. I spent three years sort of talking to people fromeverything about sort of you know have to know: clu Ecommissioning groups and the future of the hospital to potholes, to you know,prisons, the prisons crisis, because the areas MP is Chris Graling, so itwas. It was a really great time to sort of really learn. Learn your craft, a dlearn the trade of journalism, and I think lobal journalism is absolutelywhere sort of in the investigattory element of of what the press doesshould begin. You know and does begin,...

...and certainly when I was there, it wasyou know, wed go to council meetings with being caut cases. You know you gotto know the community that you are covering, and so there was that sensethat you know there was local papers, could have the resources at that time,just about tostill scrutinize. What was going on and stand up for local people?I actually so. I worked my way up and I begin an acting etitor and then I leftin about two thousand and fifteen, because the company was makingredominancies, as unfortunately, is the case all over the country, twe localpapers, and I decided it was time to move on anyway. So I went briefly tothe independence where I was an online, a news reporter, and that was the time,though, that the independent print edition was fotting down. It was allmoving online, so it was. It was sort of a very chaotic time I would say- andI just didn't ask yeah it just being an online reportev driven by content,wasn't quite what I was looking to do so I went a freelance did some criminaljustice reporting for a few years, as always interested in sprisons andNotionso revilitation. Having done my law degree, and eventually I was justwriting a blog and some of put me in touch with Peter Jukes of bylinecom lie heard ofbylinecom. I didn't know Peter, and they suggested that I should startwriting these blogs on Beind Othom, which was it is a crowd, fundedgonalist. We website. So an still sto an existence and the kind of pointbeing that if people like your work, they pay for you to do it so yesh. So Istarted doing that and then yeah L, Peter and Steven Colgrav you both bothrun byndcom and about a year of getting to know them. I would say to them: Iyou know, I love that I can still do my reporsing of be freelance, but I reallymiss my news room. I misse that feeling of a newspaper there's something abouta newspaper. That's so special and Imreportan and and then they kind ofsaid well, why don't? Why do we set one up? You know we can Wewe clan. We cando it bout, some mon short funding. We can do that. So last March we set upbyline times, which is it which aims to cover whatthe papers don't say. So what we felt was there is definitely agap in the market for news which is a bitor. You know which is old school,which is about investigation, which is about analysis, which doesn'tnecessarily tell o. What to think thut shows you what's happening, gives youthe tools to inform you as a sort of demopratic citizen about Ha, what'sreally happening, and so wal we tend to. We don't focus on a new cycle N.obviously, when big development hat's, an events are hapening, we kind of relycover them, but always you know from...

Lens looking at it for a lens whichperhaps you know it hasn't been been brought tolight. So that's what we do show stories that you can't find elsewherein the media, and I say so. For example, you know media corruption. We do a lotabout is a you know. Highlighting is Lamaphobia. We did a lot about Russiaand Russian interference, the rise of Bi right, Steve, Bann and all thesesorts of areas. So there's that and then also subjects which are coveredbut where we feel te have a new take on something or new voices, so that's yeah,so buying tens is a daily new site which is free for people to access andwe do a Montale print edition which is yeah so when, when it first started,Stephen said or we must do, we must do a print edition and yeah, and so it's really it's justreally taken off actually, and so we Doa Listin Age, newspaper and Yeah, wekind of editit and produce it in house, so yeah, and so it's it's beenfantastic journey. insiince last March, I think what we have found is peopleare crying out for the type of thing that we're offering, which is you knowwhat is actually happening, not just people's opinions and views on things,but what is actually happening? You know what kind of links andconnections are not being brought to the surface yeah. I think there's a real need forthat and also journalism that really speaks to its readership, and what Imean by that is biloing times is not sort of it's not part of what I can beestablishing media K ow. It sits outside the man street, but there is anestablishment, media and bying times it' saying. Well, you know it's lit mePeter and Steve. You know these sort of pholosophical Gors, who know what'sbest and kind of send that down to our readers, we're saying you knowWerewe're on on a level here we're just you know, you know whert, there's nokind of Hirocchal nature of what we do between the you know, the Joanis, theeditos and the redets Mi think there is in the assaption media that that doeshappen. Where you feel there's. You know a group of people who are thepeople who can tell you what's happening and then every everyone elsewho kind of sits below that were much more kind of o. You know wo just wantto realy talk to people about what's happening, what they care, Abot YeahThei'm a huge an of O in, and it always feels like that always los like it'speople that I would know, and speecy whouhave done the investigating to findout trut about things that I'm interested in, because I love the HashTag. You know what the Painis Dono say and it's like finding thattre byind theheadlines and Knowin. What's going on and from what I've seen from you know,mine fo following onfrister, and things like that, the following is justgrowing and growing. Isn't it you've go lite more and more people subscribingit's really growing. Well, isn't it...

...yeah and I think I think, because we'rsubscription based it's very much our readers sort of fund, our Bot and inthink that is so important in making people feel like we're, buildingsomething you together and that you know when we don't have sort of Wonni,Garp or very rich people funding us with some placebool views. We AreIndependent. We do have e Chrisvives and scrutinize, as we should a thedonsal administration. Having said that, to know we raise issues in the pastabout Jeme, Corbin and recently pissed ONA, with regards to donic comings, is:will lockdown behavior when the Lever Party dids ore? Not On that, so we doyeah. It is very Murch Yoknow. We are independent and you do pay for our workand I think in today's Neediau landscape that matters to people also.I think our twister is quite interesting in that we do. We likeengaging. We like interacting Hem. You know you know again like it's not tha, we know more.We just happen to have you know I sound journalist Ho can go out and spend thetime getting the factory analysis and Usort of new tanks on things, but againthat belongs to all of us once it's our where and Hiis Apto all of us what wewant to do with that information. I think and that's what you know, thatmotion of journalism being beforfor Stat, you know, I think, we've kind oflost that in media in recent years. I Tan Wee to get thatk to that that howyou do it is by you know, saying we're all we're all sort of democraticsystizens living together, and we all need to be aware of these things andTryig to make people interested in them. Yeah. Definitely, and one of the thingsI find interesting is I mi know the main people that right yous have lotsof other writers that Rightor by nine times, and it always feels like it'slots of different voices so interesting to know your thoughts on tne kind ofwomen and minorities in the media and what that's like and how byline timesCinoto find is writers yeah. So one of the reasons that we want to set upbylong times as we felt that a lot of the problems of misrepresentation insome of the news media is a result of underrepresentation of genuinelydiverse voices, and what I mean by that is sort of thisdiversity within diversity and new ants is the word I always use. You know itthings I think, increasingly in a complex while people look thesimplicity, I sein my task as trying to bring the new onms to people and fhernew ones. Whou need different voices. People were different, ligic experience,a different take on something, and so a big part of the remate is to you know.We always want more women, journaist write for US sovanyone's listening,please get in touch. We're always trying we're very aware that we want todo more on that Prom. We can and also sort of voice. You know new voices ofcolor, so one of the things that we done in regard to the latter is ourlives matter, which was our sort of its or new sort of series of work dedicatedto giving new voices of color a...

...platform and in the Wak of George foydsmurder in America. We tout that whe wants to use the platform that we'veestablished t to try and give that opportunity to people. So we've hadsome really interesting pieces that have come out to that someon. You knowit's like privilege, like job has been to edit some of those pieces. I thinkwe are. I think the MEDOR is a whole still needs to do a lot better withregards to women and minorities, and you know, then, being able to see theprofession or something which is feasible for them, not n, not just toget a foot in the door in but then to flourish. In you know, I think I feel incredibly kind of Honord to bea woman and Waer of Heuson of color in the positionI have, which is editorial, so I think it's about definitely about recruitingmore journalist. I mean we have a lot of GERMNIS approach us, but we want to you know. Sometimes we doput out calls for, like the ourlives matter series e lot more women Genis aswell. So I think it's about that. I thinks about going and making an effortto find those people. I also think Thoug, as I said it's about at theediting level and at the commissioning level you need. We need women minorityto different, diverse voices, athat level, to make sure that you know that ThiStream of work that's coming through genuinely use reflective, so yeah, Ithink byline times is great in that sense, because I definitely kind ofhave you have a definite kind of slams on thads. In terms of you know,representing minorities, I think it's something tats immedia as the wholeneeds to be able to do. I mean specifically on Esning, my notof sort of specifically on kind of people from Tak retmateminorities. I think we had a really interesting piece that came out to theallies matter series, which was like crookly Pilosia, who wrote about generational fear, holding youngAsian people back, which I just absolutely loved when I saw it because being from that same background fromAsian Community Gain Yow, exactly what you were saying. So he was saying thatyou know he wants to be a filmmaker. He wals to be a journalist is just notsomething that was ever presented to him as a career, Fr m by his family byhis community, and what he pin pointed was this notion of fear, so some fearfor your family or community around you go old. You know. Why are you going togo and do something different? It's not safe option. You know what you doingand just exploring that in that article again it's something I'm very aware ofthat. Certain people from certain minority communities will have in adifferent. You know in thery in their own ways these notions of sort of fearsand holding them back barriers holding the back up courts, but sort of fearsholding them back in the first instance- and I you know again, that's somethingthat needs to be appreciated more...

...widely by the media that actually youdo need to go out and recruit people from minorities, because there thereare certain kind of internalized mindsets, so those people will alreadyhave because one of the barriers they quite clearly face tystemicllyinsociety, but also this cultural level, which is yeah my you know my parentswere were very popex. Mi said why Don I al degree, and now I'm Gointa go and dosomething else. Like journalist, my Gad said I don't know how you're going toget into juns. You know they didn't have any contact. JUMSAMD have no ideahow you get into something like that, and I think it's about you know Te. Do Editors. Appreciatethat do do you know, do tha immediate, get that that it's not just about. Well,you know these people don't apply to US o. You know yeah yeah, icommon thing thatsaid in all sorts of work, Osor, O careers,Ist, the I ine of people that are just there infront to you will actually whathave you done to Leanlok for those people, and I go that I read that one.It really relate with me. Coming from an Indian background, T, it's kind oflike I you're not going to be a doctor or an engineer, Peoon't understand whatyou're doing and it's that thing that those career enjhoices aren't in yourlife uts and im y mental for a charity, which is for girls where theyr matchedwith woman in mentals overa year and the idea is, is the Hash Lik they usis?You can't be what you can't see: tits like the girls to actually see women,doing these different careers howwesome to see the yortions theres other words,How d you know what arees there are. You know what things are amaining withyou. You know ten years ago, boy wasn't a Jorof social media manager, but nowthere is it's like Ye, those things if you're not exposed to them, whichkindly myquestion do you think the media is becoming more accessible as acareer choice for women minorities, or do you think itsstill very much kind of boys network hard to get intois a career I mean so when I got into it nearly sort of thro eight years ago.I certainly had that perception in my mind that this, as my dad said, youknow how are you going to get into Joirnis at and not that generationalfears what piled on me- and I thought- Oh, my God, how would I ever get intogounalism, because I think it is still seen the mainstream prismin to journismI's still seen as sort of yeah the domain of people who already in thenote and what I mean by that is people who have certain networks, have certainconnections and also people who, like from an from a much earlier time,are around sort of those sort of around journalism or, but you know be being ageurmalist. Is A vibal option, people who just sort of understand that muchearlier and therefore see it as something we ca realistically do so, Ithink hows it changed. I mean I think that still exists to some extent. Ithink anyone who gets into gemism...

...always will think this is it's reallyhard thing to get into? Having said that, I do think with the Aten atsocial media, with the advent of people being able to build their ownplatforms. I do think things are starting to change, which is what we'retrying to do with byoloing time to o build a platform which is which ismeant to seem much more accessible. So we get s a lot of our journanlists, ais Yousa Mo. You know thereare often people who you would term as sort ofSititan Jeni people who haven, dome, jouranism, training or anything likethat, but have a great nose for a story and want to sort of, and the just needsome assistance to sort of get it out where all kind of younger people whohaven't got any experience of writing and want to you know, get some get somethings published, which will then help them kind of build up a porfodio. I dothink by like Tineson sort of more accessible news. Publications are starting to helpwith that. Also, I think there is a kind of Zid gised is about sort ofrecognizing diversity and and sort of complex to you, there's increasing. Istill think it's divecope that so in that respect, I see that as veryhopeful that- and this is what sort of Peter Jewkesand steam colgrave wo the founder of butling time. So Ai've always said tome. You know well, if, if you feel you, you know, if you feel you don't have aplatform, you build your own Patform, you build your own platform and thenyou have your own voice. You know not not a voice that is sort of curtailedand e Felins by what it's Meda Wat. It has to sound like tbut just your voice,so I think that is real. So I think that it is that point is making Junsamore accessible. I think when we're talking about themainstreampress aslike with the more establishing media, I still think that yeah. I still thinkthat those perceptions exist jounism hard to get into unless you havecontacts unless you have networks, unless you know that you want to do itfrom an early stage and you can get the work, experience and porvideos unlessyou have the resources to be able to do on PAP, workg experience and that allof those things still problems, yeah, definitely yeah a as you know, I'minvolved in Subsex Ya he en wwline R, which re all about sitizen journalismand people having a go wiing. Something I like to think. We kind of getting people published a ecause, thenpitched about main biline times crazy te people that are just writing theircitizen story and it's been quite powerful thing to get going. Wha haveseen from that. It's been my first kind of experiences of what social media canbe like with those things. How do you deal with twinter, trols andthe kind of social media interest comments, etc that you get yeah, I'mabsolutely troned of the regional...

...bylines? I think it's so I a'm sopleased that they're developing. Because of that point I made early. Youknow I started in local GENISEM and we've all seen how it's beenobliterated and again, there's so much grass roots corruption and sort of scandal that issort of going on reportant. You know I very much believe that Janisan startsfrom from the grass roups up, and so I'm delighted that all all thesenetworks or bylines a are popping up. I think they're really vital. I thinkyou're doing fantastic work and that's the way to build bat change, buildthose platforms, twitter. Yes, I think social media is,I mean, says: apolsitive side. Is You can start building our own platform andGA OORLESM of that yeah? The more kind of darkasside is yeah everyone.Everyone can give you sort of their take on something I think that's mainlycan be very positive, because I think you want to hear from people who maybehave a different take on on what you've published, don't agree with it orwanted challent driving. That's really important. Actually, I think what we try to do where we cannotbe feel it's appropriate is to engage the people on that. You know andto either try to explain what our thinking was on the detorial level or try to understand more about whattheir concerns are. wintrolling. I think you know so you engage when you feel it'sconstructive where it's trolling, which I think is designed to shot down. Whatwe're you know the nature of what we're all trying to do, which is inherentlylearn and share information and sort of gain knowledge. I don't yeah. Idon't think that's helpful. I think early on, especially W EF WE LAUNCHDbyling times there was a lot of. I think it was one asticle that wepublished in particular about hedge funds, so the number of you know howmuch we raised the nos. We raise thequestion that it's legitimate to kind of ask whether it's right, thet, BorisJohnsons Party and Morrisons himself has received a considerable amount offunding from people who happen to be associated with hedge funs and theirerole and fort of a Nodo breaxetand and that sort of thing and it caus quite ayou ow. It's quite controversial. You know it spartsoll these conversationson twitter, about yeah, disas, ter capitalism and some people raiseconcerns about the article and the figures and we complete each other ARboard. And you know we reissue the clarification and there's one point init that needed: carfifation o. We did that and we werefers to admit nhat. Welike that's fine, but this the have to mit the stawbry and the snear seriousthat went along with that o what byline times you? What is this, and I think itdoes need to be called out, though- and...

...this is this at the establishment-media kind of just being very smallbish, very sneering- of what you know we weretrying to just because that story happen to be quite controversal whenquite big and quite new i's a lot yeah, and I just and for me that was reallyrevealing, because it proves the point I'm trying to make that you know I you know yeah, so that was that was arevealing bit of so i Dont Iw answer your question: ofit Yeah! No, I doesdefinitely which CI leaves me on to my next thought about onl of this, soiiwas followed Blani, avidly, all the time and I've seen some of the stories.Do you get some stories, particularly just get a high profile, so there'sbeen som particular articles that have and what Senis is that you've oftenuncovered things that appear in the mainstream media a bit later on sothet's been quite a few times. I've seen stories like that there was oneparticular I saw that you wrote, I think about Asian when IIS WACI for Brexit. I thinkwhis ten appeared inthe newspaper a bit later on to see that happen a few timesand IGUESS. We, he mainstream mediay establishment media. Do they engagewith you and what do you do when they pick up on your stories like that anduse them? Do you do anything about that? Yeah, so dod engage with us. I wouldsay not not on the level that sort of edites ol reporters are approaching usfrom from those mainstream publications. I think it's great when sort of theGuardian or BBC picks up on you know this thing about hedge boms, which kindof you know did end up. Questions were asked in parliament about it. Theformer chance o Philip hammerd kind of raised, raises issue barris Johnson'sown sister commented on it, so I mean none of that was related to buy liketimesit inisial secrete reporting, but it was Braf toly that is, she picked upsiddenrly with the contracts that the government sort ofsigning with any number of companies, regardless of their expertise or theisort of predenisials and theyr ties for FERTIV party. That's SOM, going on on amoveent and has been kind of Reantoaf because of the coronoiris crisis, Olots of contracts to with PP and and sort of that sort of thing which youknow where were sort of out the forefront top. I would say- and I thinkthere was also a story so thats getting picked up by all the other ouberts aswell. There's anotther story about domnit comings, hiring a sort of socialmedia digital company to do some coronavirus messaging, which also ispoption the Guardian. So there's a we. You know we're not often we're notreally creditive when that happens Mo, but it's okay, because our we see ourrole existing as giving the mainstream media O Notch. You know that's what thepapers don't say. So when we that happens, we feel like our function isfulfilled. There ave been instances where our wethes islands argume say itlooks as if it's just been taken. So the article that yeah you mentioned. Iwrote quite a a sennormal piece liess...

...about why son He Asian Immigrant Pechta,leav the? U based on the story of my parents who immigrants from Keno inIndia and both didvote these. So I pobished that last sort of April andthen what was really interesting was recently. It was just because a lot ofour stories- don't age, they're, quite tineless n, because theyre very liylook at struptural issues and society and politics, so that happen to beretweeted by Chris Gray. I think who's quite prominent rexic commentator andand the very next day the story appeared in the express online which, as building on the idea, ideas that Iraise but too quine more high reporteng with no credit. So I can say that we did raise theissue and it has now been debeated. Oh really, okay, for something to tappen aa Resol, interesting it. It's just a story that so yeah yeah. I couldn't sort of see sort ofwork like done being being just kind of kid to have just been lifted and sortof I'm told that it wasn't sort of yeah but yeah interesting and how aboutitriction from? I don't know: Radio Logal, radio, TV things like that. Doyou see Tou get appreaches from other forms of media for any of you tocomment or appear as guest or anything like that e whare, you still very muchfron the fritages on people, Thon't Wedo that yeah Ewe do get approachesfrom. I would ta mainstream across radio and television which which ispositive. So we a we have done. A few SEGENS PC jecas appeared on Sky News afew times. I've had some approaches tougho thetimes BBC. So that's really positive, and I think when thos approaches havebeen made is to get sort of a not not different. Take but yeah, I give youknow trying to give a platform. Andto peoplewho might have you know might be able to Shetdifferent light on something. So that's really positive to see I'll be on theFRINGET, so I'd say we're really proud of saying that we're outside of anysystem. So what we mean by that is just always is the reason I left law in away. I found it very stimulating inesting,but I don't want to be in that. Ssistiten might rather be outside of itandserve it a comments on it and I think that's where independence comesfrom and therefore sort of why people? Why are readers trossible we kind ofproduce so we're very much outside systemihobby? I think I have a feeling that we're less, I think when you startit,you would be considered as like, like fringe on the fringes, rather notFrench fringes. I think that's soly sorting to change. I think you know.We've got some high profile sort of followers. Now Peter Oborn took out asubscription to buyline times a couple of weeks ago and POBLISIZE ER ontwitter.

I don't yeah, I don't think it. I thinkit sits outside of the mainstream but more more people, ase sort of saeing.That is a good thing. If you know what I mean yeah, I mean that's what I'mseeing I see more people that I wouldn't have thought necessarily wouldbe aware of you, sharing your onon social media andthat's, interesting, athey're. Also following by line times. It's been really interesting from Ahathappened. We've just sort of we've very much have this policy andthat you know we very assh about what we do. We put it out there. We don'tsort of make a prochase to people to retweet article me. We don't make apreachase to hypreor people to betweet things, and so we just sort of in thatSenense. We just do what we do keep focused on that. But it is it'sfantastic that you know yeah they are being picked up. Yeah I think we went. We were. There was ahash, I think, John to list. One of our commentators right peach bout boresjonswill be the Anton primatiste. I be pretty thoug that trended beyond youknow the Ante Prilimitig and I was kindolike boke up in the morning and Iwas Likeoh dos that say morning we were tryined o yeah, so that was Aday. Iremember seeing that I ye W and hen our website had so many clicks on to it,but it kind of crashed yes OA, which ISOA Eah an Hoit's, really positive tosee that yeah and so what next FOM byline time support. You See, I seeyou're trying to get a certain number of subscribers. Aren't you t one ofyour goals but yeah? What do you see is next fo byline times yeah, so we'revery fist approaching tensand subcrivers across so the print edition which can get Iverto your door or a digital version of that into your invox? That will be areal maston for us. I think it's just expand hat. We can do in terms of moremore, you know more journalist, more invest, you know longer investigations and yeah. Just you know also, you know yeah. So Ithink t that's a that's a real sort of aim of hours. We want. I say I guess ina wider sense, we all we want to have impact. You know so this journey ofhaving launched last March being on the fringes and so will be ere becomingaware of us. It's yes, it is to nodge the give the maintre media anlarge, butbut it's Al Fitter. We Wan't we're doing this because we feel that you know the meinstry media is failing incertain regards to properly scrutinize and examine and some of the morestructural issues and conflicts, especially politically that are present, and so we wan the work doto have some influence on that. We we do want questions to be asked inparliament. You know we do want people to be more informed, they might writeto their MP and I think it's very easy with journism, especially today,because it's twent four seven you just get lost and Ryou know lost in this seaof information, there's information...

...everywhere, but the WT. What do you do? ANCE? Youhave that information. So I think that's our that's our real real goal tosort of increase and work on how the increased the impact that we could wecan have for our readers by highlighting highlight in theseissues. We've also got byline TV, which is, is asyste company.It's separate to byline times a IT USTHERES. This is a company thatlaunchd recently with the tagline. If you love byling times your love, bylingTV, so that's sort of a parallel project. T that's happeningand again that same that same notion, that you know whatthe peogles don't say again in sort of film and Video Gams, that we want toexamine sort of unreported issues andunreported voices and angles so were hoping to do that yeah. We just we just hope to keep me.We want more people to read you ow, heir of us. We want to. You know we areindependent, so we are, you know not afraid of repousing on we know it's notwe're not fitting to get a party, so you know Mor Wecan get more resources,we're going to get mor people in and we can start covering some areas. I think we could do more on as well yeah, so I just hope it' sort of I h, yeah and also this notion of thenews, the newspaper and having a newspaper and reading it I' like to think that you know that becomes that that stat.You know that that I'd like to think that that just growsin terms of the number of people who are pret- you know reading in thesetimes. Again with you know, digital news, Fafeor seven social media people realie see the value bof having and you know something in their handshat. They could read over the couse for a month and really kind of Dick in anoutol but their own pace and make them think about things. I hope the appealof that keeps growing. I hope people want that. I think it's. I think it'spretty special, so yeah, I think yeah Greatu, so yeah. I I subscribe. Thedigital edition, bactually most friends is described. You've got the Paininversion and I'm thinking acally. I I see the value of that because, as yousay, pieces are on o time they don't nage in terms of news tor of the moment.That means you can read it over the month. So I can see why people aregoing for the ADO version for sure. So, where do people find you? How dopeople approach byline times, if they're interested to know more an theywant to write? Yes, so obviously we have our news light, which is bylineTimescom, which is free for everyone to access on that website. You have there's a...

...there's a subscribe bottom, which givesyou alsome options as to how loocan support US subscribe to print or Jituleditions. We do want to hear from journamist with a story, new voices,new angles and it's news at bioling, Timescom or Inso at biine Timescom ormy email dress, which is also on my twitter page, which is party at BingTimescom, so yeah. We encourage people to get in touch, especially those whofeel that they have not had a platform elsewhere, and you know yeah havesomething you to say something new Wans to say we're really looking for that. Soplease you get in touch Brillian! Thank you! So much, it's been an absoluteletter to Tal to you. I really hape one Dar we can meet in person that will happen soon. Re Waitssorttyou. Thank you so much, and this has been the reimagination at workpodcast with a wonderful gas, tording theory from the biline times you canfind watch this spacea watch this space of DOTCHK and on social media to watchthis SPC anliin watch this spee hience. Thank so much Tun for the next episode.

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