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Episode 3: The New ‘Normal’: How's It Going So Far?

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

Hello everybody, and welcome to reimagination at work podcast. This is our third episode of our three part series. Sadly, we're coming to an end on our new normal series. This episode it's all about getting back to normal. And how's that going for everybody? We're going to be talking about our two predictions, ideas of thoughts about how it's going now and how things are changing and how we want them to change because, as we've said throughout the series, we don't really want to go back to normal. We need to reimagine what normal should be in this post pandemic world. So today I'm joined by a leg we're chapman and MOCANDELAU. Welcome guys. How are you doing? All good. How are you? Yes, not too bad, having a good week and sunshine always house. Yeah, it's amazing how much of a different kind of outlook it gives you when the sun is out, even when you're in lockdown. How are you? Both? Not Bad. Still Bad. It's yeah, definitely happy that the sun's out. It's starting to feel a bit less like the apothetic. Yeah, yeah, it's Nice. Yeah, definitely nice to feel like it is edging towards you know, like not normal, obviously, because that's not what we want, but being edging towards freedom and togetherness in a physical manner, which sounds very sexual, and I want to be together with you, in a together with both of you, and a physical manner every way. Shame of and it's weird how time is parting actually, because, you know, it just felt like it was all going to drag. Actually, now like another week's nearly gone. It's kind of the time just goes. It's going pretty fast actually. Yeah, sure, I don't know whether that's because every day feels quite similar. This morning I got up at what would be my normal time in normal life, put makeup on, did my hair, chose out some clothes that were not jogging bottoms and Pajama and then I came to my office. No one else is here, FY I do all of this work. So, yeah, it kind of feels regular. I'm gonna not use the word normal. We're gonna DIG Right into our topic of our third and final podcast of this first series, the new normal. How's it all going, Leguad Chapman, how about you kick us off with your first contribution and we'll see if we agree with you. I would love to Rachel Pears. And so in terms of how normals going, I know from speaking to you a lot of different people that a little businesses have had a lot of flexible working and remote working requests landing on their deskchool ready. It's quite interesting. My husband's had a survey round from his work. Are King specifically about what the people wanted to work from home more often, how they'd like to do that with. They're interested in...

...it. I know it's something that a lot of friends and other business owners I've spoken to you have been saying that they're really interested in. Now. They really want to increase that, you know, the time that they work from home after all this is over. They want to carry on doing at least a couple of days a week at home. That's going to be something that business you to think about because if they haven't had a plan for how they come out of looks down and what they do about flexible working and long term, they need start thinking about that right now. They need to start thinking about how they're going to make it work long term rather than just as a reaction to coronavirus and everything that's going on, and it can actually be really beneficial for a lot of businesses. While there's pressure to follow social distancing measures to keep certain health safety guidelines in place, having fewer people physically in the office could be a real advantage. Could actually make it a lot easier to follow those guidelines make it look safer. There's talk now of if certain areas get a spike in cases that might be local lockdowns. But then what happens if you're in lockdown, say you live in Brighton and you work in London. If you're in lockdown in Brighton but your office is still open, you know, how's that going to work? So actually, if let's working, you know, remote working is more of an option than that makes it much more possible for for your employees here in different areas to keep working no matter what. Yeah, I think I'm definitely agree with that one because it's there have been businesses that work like this already. There are examples of companies that have always worked like this and it wasn't such a big thing for them. But equally there are a lot of businesses it said it can't be done and that you couldn't do that job remotely, and that's now changed and they've had to, I imagine, there are lots of companies looking at their processes right now and you know how they can be get set out for this because they, as you've already said, they being inundated with request for it. Yeah, when we're working with businesses, that's one of the things that we look at, is how they can make flexible working work and how they can can put that into tea action. And so from that we know how important is to have a really robust process, because it isn't just a case of just doing what you do now but via video call or slackers. A lot more to it. You can't just meet you're existing set up online and then that's it. Yeah, I think it's going to come down to how how much forward planning businesses are putting in right now. Yeah, I'm thinking about businesses that are extremely non traditional businesses. So obviously film production, TV production as just shut down industries where they're requires people to be in physical contact, so you know like hairdressers, beauty cell ons, that kind of thing as well. Lots and lots of human interaction and touching. I wonder how how the future looks for them in terms of like future proofing. Like we kind of touched on last episode. It's kind of beyond me at the moment about how that can even how that can even work. I hope it does, because I'm extremely UNCAMFUTA and I need a beauty cell on like before the pub's...

...open. So, yeah, hair dressing is a really interesting one because obviously no, there's there's no way that you can do remote hairdressing. That would be disasters. But you can do mobile hairdressing. It obviously it requires you to be in contact with one person, but it limits the number of people that you're in contact within it. It means that that you can be a bit safer and and and I guess also track you've been in contact with a wonder if there's going to be more of a model of that kind of one on one, you know services where it is more of a you know, people coming to you, coming out to people's houses, more of a kind of private interaction rather than, yeah, so a busy head people, which could lead to more options for people for working as well. Yeah, I certainly hope that's still going to get going to because I also badly need a haircut. I massively cuttle of my hair off right full, looked down and I'm not growing it out. So this is actually proved to be out of perfect time. I guess it's about the attitude. is about the attitudes of people come to it with of we're minimizing the risk, when we know it's not realistic to expect to completely obliterate the risk. So and people need to work, people need to make a living. So it is about minimizing what risk there is. So going. Yeah, mobile services like that are much better. Cool. So, Mo let's move on to your point. Yeah, so mine is actually kind of connected to Legras in lots of way. So I think there's going to be less concentration on cities. So we've already seen Cambridge University, for example, of moved their entire year online until next year. And more businesses are recruiting remotely. They're thinking about how roles can work remotely. So I think that's going to lead to then businesses assessing how much office space the actually did, where the office needs to be, what does the office need to be for? And I think then that I think we'll see that there will be less of an impact on living in city. So you don't have to work live in London. And can we all commute hours to London to do certain roles. I think it will change things and my end sort of longer term, I feel like that's going to have a benefit because it'll be less pressure on housing spread to the economy, so you don't have, hopefully don't have so many sort of areas that fill deprived because you can't get a job there, so everyone leaves there. I think there's going to be kind of redistribution of where people are located to work, which is going to have I think that's going to stay. A lot of that. I don't think we're going to see that will go back to how it was and that I've seen lots of articles online actually, and a blog post about. You know, is this the death of the office as we know it? Yeah, I can confirm that that is is happening, because we've been looking for a little while about moving a bit further out of Brighton, because we're based right in the center of well hove actually the moment and we've...

...been looking for a while and moving a little bit further out to get a little bit more space and be nearer to the beach, which we really like. What we can't ever do right in the center of hope, because it's ridiculous expensive. Yeah, we you know, we've been looking at that for a while. But actually, what kind of able does that mean? Then my husband's up preaching his job and he's really happy where he works. He's really suffoled. She does not mean having to him having to change jobs, as it mean I'm reaching everything. But actually now, if he's working from home a few days a week, commuting a bit further for the days they just have to go in to the office, isn't so bad and we can then move further out, have that space and that kind of you know, cheaper houses well, which would be nice and and yeah, that kind of better quality of life and better balance. So we're doing that now. You know that's happening. We're our places on the market. We're off so hopefully. People talk about the UK being overcrowded. It isn't. Only about one percent of the UK is inhabited, but the problem is we have such dense clusters, London obviously being the biggest one, but you've got Birmingham and Manchester and places like that that it are the only places where you can get jobs. So everybody flocks there and, as you said, both. That puts huge pressure on resources housing. You know, it causes huge areas of social separation in some areas and it creates all of these problems in it it's it makes people feel overcrowded and over powers and really stressed out, whereas actually, if you can spread that out and then distribute the resources more evenly and people have space to breathe and there's less pressure on everything, then it will just make everything look better for everybody. Yeah, yeah, I agree with that one and very fortunately your point links to my first point. So I'm just going to respond with my first point. What you were saying around two people even need physical offices anymore. We're going to see a decline in physical shared office spaces. Like individuals, businesses might not even have their, you know, their own premises. Like start visibility. We've got a nice office. Everyone, I think, likes being it. I like being it. I'm here right now. But one of my points was, I think, for me personally and I think for a lot of people who have gone through our three hundred and sixty with working from home. So I used to hate working from home. I used to like being surrounded by people. My job is quite people focused anyway, and when I first started working from home it was really off court. I've definitely become accustomed to it now I see like I've seen the light, but I've seen the benefits of like working from home and being a bit more in control of your time and destiny and day and what you do and when and all of that kind of stuff. Think it's going to be awfully hard for me and for a lot of people to actually now...

...that we're sort of easing up lockdown stuff, businesses are going back to work. I think people are going to really struggle and need support for going back to you know how it was before all, albeit with probably social distancing measures in place in physical offices. So my prediction, I guess, linked to my that point and your point, Mos, that I think probably going to see a lot of office spaces up police, especially ones that have or maybe not especially ones that have their team working in the same city. For me, I'm coming at it from a selfish point of view and that my job is managing six other people as well as doing kind of client deliverable work as well. I'd see it as quite easy one to for us to take our business and work from home and not have a physical office because we're all close together in terms of the city, in terms of Brighton Hove, but a people, a couple of people in shore them whereas initially I would have thought that that would be too difficult and I wouldn't enjoy it. For those one on ones that I have with my team, there's no reason why we can't physically meet up in a coffee shop and have those important conversations and development discussions, training and all of that kind of stuff in in person and just do you know, the business and the work that we need to do online. We've got lots of tools that help that. So I think, yeah, my prediction is I hope I don't have to come back to a physical office because I'm going to find it too difficult and I don't think that we totally need them anymore. And believe me, listeners, that is a complete like turnaround from my my opinion mere months ago. So you have no idea how much that is a departure from the ratiel of just before lookdown. I also just went up into a bit of a reverie while you were talking, imagining sitting in a coffee shop with somebody, because probably the thing I miss most of the moment. I'm missing the frightened lanes, coffee shops, like I haven't had an expertly made flat white four months and I realize this is first world problems like I make like for me to for that to be one of my top problems at the moment is incredibly privileged and and, yeah, kind of stupid, but I do miss it. So, you know, yeah, I guess anything I worry about is kind of people's and different need as people mental have different needs. People, some people really thrive in that office environment. So it's just going to be thinking about those things and how you can repreat that. Or do you have that some of the time? Yeah, how do you make it work? Yeah, yeah, and support needs as well, you know, for people with different kind of physical needs. How were they going to be provided for if there's no office? How are you going to be checking in with people to make sure they're okay? How are you going to be keeping that company culture going? Yeah, there's a lot to think about with it, but I yeah, I think that will be pretty high on a lot of people's continuacy plans right now because, especially...

...if they've taken a financial hit with with all of this going on, if they're thinking will actually we can we keep some costs by letting our office space go? Yeah, there's going to be a lot of boring considerations as well, like Internet, like, who pays for that? If we're all work home? Health and safety? Do we need to worry about health and safety and people's homes, like from a business perspective? Yeah, so in most corporation. So there's I used to work in Bigger Cup corporations where they do have to think about that. So they would. They have work from home policy that you have to do a risk assessment for working from home. Some companies even give you a budget to buy a desk and chair. You know, the husband coming, my husband works. Will they do that? So there are bigger companies will of some of them will have those things in place, not all, but it's a it's all of the other businesses that would have never even thought about that. Then we need to think about that. Yeah, completely. Yeah, cool. Right, let's move on. A LEGRA, it's your turn again. Well, this actually fits quite nicely with what we're just talking abou out, because I don't have enough this because I'm I'm on one man and one woman band gout done the Patriarchy and the gendered language. I am one woman band, so I well, I can a co working space and that's been really, really valuable for me for from lots of different perspectives. One just for my mental health. Getting out of the House and going and seeing other humans and having people around me when I'm working is really nice, even if I really, you know, some days we're necessarily speak to anybody really, but just having other humans near you is a really nice thing and get just getting out the house. I really know if we do all end up at a in a place where we're not at working physical officism, we're working remotely. I really recommend to everybody to get themselves a co working space membership and go go somewhere to work, because it I did try a little while when I first needs to bright nose, commuting up to London two days a week, working from home the rest of the time, and I was actually working in my flat. I'm going absolutely out of my mind and getting really just, yeah, stressed and fed up about it. So I really recommend people can get out and get a CO working membership for the gender that in that situation is. It really helps, but also foot for me it's been really valuable for networking and business connections. I've got clients through connections that I've made in that space. You know, I collaborated with a lot of people I've met. There's been a lot of work that suppo from that. So it's really, really youthful to me and I am now kind of wondering about what that's going to look like. And you know, it's a great thing about co working spaces of their places where you can share ideas. You can just be sitting working away and someone there's are does anyone know anything about this, and then you can have a little past about that. You can tryelmation and you can pick ideas around and you know, all of that side of thing is great when you're working on your own.

So well for anybody, but particular if you're on your own. So yeah, I'm kind of wondering what's gonna Happen to that now and how that's going to operate or where where that opportunity for collaboration and corporation is going to go for, you know, particularly for people who work by themselves. And that said, Folda scrosier so the projects who are a co working space in the center of Brighton or a client of mine and obviously, with everything's going on, I've been really closely involved of conversations open having about about their next steps and they're reopening. You know, they've been working incredibly hard. Best is their operations manager as an Asia legend. She's been working incredibly hard to put lads of different safety measures in place and work out, you know, the best way to make the building available people safely so they can use them and get all of those benefits. But also they've had a lot of things online. They've they've created a lot of but actual ways that people can still attend events, training and, you know, kind of people that learning, but also collaborate with one another, share ideas and kind of keep that community going. So I think it would be really interesting to see how that progresses and whether there's more of a blend now of that virtual collaboration and online community building as well as the offline side. But I hope that we can, you know, be able to keep the offline going as well. Yeah, there's been some really good online collaborations during this time. It's almost been overwhelming. There's been so many opportunities to dial into different types of webinars and networking events. I went to a great events last week. It was last week where, I'll give a little plug to her, actually had a barry who runs a coffee company, runs and linkedin posting parties where you will get together, you meet each other, talk about what you do and then you like and share each other's linkedin post so it's a way of like creating the online community. There's been like conferences online, there's been, as she said, with the projects having their community online. There's been a lot of those things and it be great to see that continue so that people that are working remotely have ways to connect with people. I've had a couple of meetings in coworking spaces before and I kind of feel like they're great areas for creativity, like especially the projects and platform line. They're the way that they're designed. I mean those are the only two I've been in, so I literally can't talk about any others. The way they're designed are to foster kind of creativity. They've got enough resources for you to go and kind of deep work by yourself and it's another option for businesses who do want to do away with their their actual premises. If they rent or own premises but still keep regular in person collaboration together or have like bigger company meetings together, they can rent spaces and those...

...co working spaces to do that. Or if they really have people in their teams who are just like I just can't work on my own at home, I hate it, then there's an option, a much more affordable option there for them to provide them with the co working desk in a co working space for them to feel the energy of people around them, you know, make connections and that kind of thing, and actually that's probably quite a lucrative thing to have access to as a business you've got, especially in Brighton it's so creative. Lots of start up businesses are in coworking spaces, so tapping into that kind of startup energy is can be really refreshing as well if you're in a more established business. So that's definitely something that should be considered as part of the mix of what comes next. There are a lot there are lots of the lots in London is where now so we work, and the famous ones for that, but there are businesses that are purely based in those we work facilities where they have, you know, they have bars and you have like beers on a Friday in these, but they also have meeting spaces they hit. A lot of those businesses might have bigger team. So maybe software engine is at are base there, but they can get them in for meetings if they need to. So that I think there's going to be. I don't think homeworking is going away. I think it will be in different ways. I'll be virtual ways of networking as well, but I think it's going to be more use to those kinds of things. We think about the projects is has got those sort of members club by and also I went as a guest. I'm not a member because I'm not that one. Deep and fine invite me to so hour house in London and for a day just very swanky swing pool on the roof, and that does and lovely and all that. All those sorts of things I think are going to increase in popularity now and people are really keen for those networks, those connections and yeah, bit being able to tap into that, that sense of community and especially if they can have an online component as well, to bring more people in and make it more accessible to more people. I think that would be really interesting to watch. Yeah, awesome, cool. So, Mo what's your second and final point to share with the listeners? Yeah, so for me, I it's my final point to share. It's about creativity. I think there's going to be more creativity done in different ways, leading to more diversity and ation. Is My prediction. So we've already got people working in different locations, working different hours and using different types of collaboration tool. So whether it is, you know, zoom for video conferencing, or there are other kinds of collaboration tools that you've seen people using where they can put ideas together and brain storm and, you know, share ideas, and it's going to lead to there's going to be more of that, and there's all kinds of stats about this, which is why it's so frustrating that nothing changes. More diverse teams have more creative ideas that make companies more money. So it can only be a good thing to have different ways of creating all of these ideas and that this time has led to that, because that's got to change. So instead of...

...having the same types of people coming up with product ideas and things like that and getting promoted because they've had the great idea. I predict that we're going to see more creativity, better ideas and different types of people being the people that lead those things. Yeah, definitely, it's like we're all on the same wavelength. Seriously, because I'll allego, you can go. I'll let you go first, but my my final point is again very much linked to what you just said. So I agree. The only thing that is going to add to what may said was that I do think there's a weird link between lookdown and creativity, because I think we mentioned on a previous episode that I've had some sort of weird creative but that sounds that's a horrible words, really gross change that I'm major. Yeah, yeah, Rachel can edit that out. And I have had a surge of creative season since I was that. It's weird because this has been probably one of the mast stressful times of my life. It's been really stressful, it's been horrible and there's a lot about it that is is a nightmare. And yet so I'm a free lance writer and and a fiction writer as well, and I found myself suddenly being just, you know, ridiculously prolific and my writing, I'm churning things out left, right the center, and you know, I've really pretty locked down for quite a while. Been Struggling to make stivate myself to write for myself, the open writing. I do a lot of writing for work, which I was sa have to do because that's how I get paid, but the stuff for myself I've really struggled with. And suddenly it's all, it's all just, you know, pouring out of me and coming and I I've noticed with a lot of people, people who work in different creative careers. You know, well, Rachel has been all over the place. They're making films and writing and filming stuff and I know, you know I said a little friends who are actives, youth been and, you know, creating these things and playwrights and you know, suddenly everybody seems to be turning work out all over the place and it's really interesting. I think that something in the pressure and the stress have looked down seems to have unlocked something in a lot of people, not to say everybody. There are a lot of people are feeling really blocked at the things, very stressed, and that's fine and you shouldn't be paying pressure on yourself to be massively creative just because lads of people are posting shit on instagram. It's you know, it's it's fine not to be doing that, but I do think it's interesting that it does seem to kick something off in a lot of people. Yeah, I don't think. Yeah, I told I totally agree and I don't think that it's necessarily like well, yeah, it's not a bad thing. If you're a creative person. That's your job, how you make money, how you get enjoyment, and you've just gone absolutely no, I can't be productive, I'm struggling, like that's finely. You know, there's there's been so many kind of dickheads on twitter being like if you're not producing a best work in this lockdown, there's amazing opportunity of time, then like you're wasting you you know, you're wasting...

...your time or whatever, and it's a real guilt trip upon people. And you know, like, as everybody has had a billion times, we are living in unprecedented times and you know, like just get through it, how you can get through it. But if you're getting through it, and and I think that this is what sets people apart who are making making the most of it as a wrong terminology. But the people who are finding that there, this situation has impacted their creativity positively and they're out, but positively, tend to be a bit more opportunistic, and opportunistic tends to have a really negative kind of connotations, like you're an opportunistic person. That sounds like I'm insulting you. I think being opportunistic and being able to recognize and then act on an opportunity is actually an act of optimism. I think that things that have previously been passion projects, that have been on the back burner, are going to become careers for people. I'm an example of that. Like I've been on furlough for this is my six week and I've got five more weeks of fellow which I'm excited about. There's a lots of things that I miss about, you know, my team and my work and stuff, but I feel like this is an opportunity for me. I've done a lot of retraining and learning that could potentially change my career trajectory, you know, in a couple of years time. So I think that's what's cut what I am seeing right now. So, like when we say the new normal, how's it going? And definitely noticing people going this is what I'm passionate and interested about, what I've really been passionate and interested about all along. But you know, I have to make money to live and stuff. So whilst I'm still sort of earning money but I'm furloughed or I'm working part time, I'm gonna I'm going to seize the day, as it were, and I think, yeah, a lot of people have maybe rediscovered or discovered new passions or new interests or new talents and gifts that they've augmented with learning and training in this time, and so we'll see that kind of shifting, people taking on new career pasts in it in like the next twelve months or so, and that makes me really excited because it means that people are hopefully seizing something that brings them a lot of joy and happiness, and so we're going to hopefully see a lot more people in jobs that make them really happy and productive and fulfilled, and that's really, really exciting. People have either been saying, well, actually, it's made me realize I didn't like what I did, and this made them think, well, okay, if I didn't like doing that, then I need to plan for why I am going to do and they've been doing that. All the people that say, well, I do like what I do, but actually I've always wanted to do this too, and so well, actually, I'd be better at what I do if I if I learn how to do this. So there's been people doing that and I...

...think we've because we've had that time, not just the working day, it's also the evenings as well, where you've had time to do different things because you're in the house already. So it's like, well, I don't want to just do the same thing every evening. What about, for I do this, what about if I do that? So it's kind of been a time where people have discovered their passions and lots of ways, but not everybody. I mean I think that's the sort of Utopia of you. There are people that have been really stressed and it. You know, it's been horrible time for them all. There are people that have been sitting there think you want to I've realized I don't like what I do, but I don't know what to do about that as well. So there are other aspects to this year of it being great, but I've seen loads of people we really creative. Yeah, I think there's something in that, that old saying that necessity is the mother of invention, because often it takes the I mean, obviously we don't often get situations quite this extreme, but it's sometimes does take extreme situations to give you a push to do something else or to rethink what you're doing, and I so. You know, I never ever would have become self employees if I hadn't had my daughter. You know, I was never planning to do that. I never intended to work myself. I always thought it was quite happy taking a salary and having all the perks that go with that and the security. And then that happens and suddenly have to go self employe. Doesn't have any choice. Now it turned out to be the best thing that could possibly happened to me and then, you know, happen. Really enjoying that and it's been really great. What I've still been doing, you know, kind of the same sort of thing I was doing before, just for myself, and we've had this opportunity to reevaluate everything again and I've been able to go what actually was I really care about. What I really care about is diversity and making workplaces better for people and having people not feel that they have to leave because they've had a child or because there were a woman or you know, that they're the same up. Cheese's aren't open to them because of their ethnic backgrounds or whatever, so they're going to have to, you know, become self employed or leave whatever. So we've had this chance to kind of come together and build which this space make that happen and then, you know, I would I'm really passionate about out is supporting the women who have been, you know, kind of felt they've had to leave their jobs. So I'm I'm putting more energy into shaping the training side of my business, in the mentoring so that I can be there and help those women. And, you know, on the writing side of things, I think I know it is absolutely fine if you're blocks right now because you're so stressed out. That's that makes total sense. But for me, and I think for a lot of people, it's the creativity has been a way of kind of working through all the stress. It's way of almos kind of processing it and dealing with it or by by channeling that into it, into your creativity. So you know, there a lot of people, I think, that's really kicked something off in them. Part of everyone with children. I will say that, you know, if I hear one more time about how much free time everyone's got, I am going to kind of go on some sort of murderous roundpage. You know, there is no free time. If you've if you're looking after other people in your house, it's it. You know, it is Incredi be stressful. You have to grab opportunities when they come to you have to see these what opportunities you can get, otherwise you...

...won't get anywhere. So yeah, it's about hopefully just being able to just go okay, well, the worst has happened, I got to make the best of it now. Yeah, definitely awesome. So we find ourselves in the very interesting position of having to choose two of our predictions, thoughts contributions to this episode. I'm out living now to give us all time to think about our to vote. I'll go first. I'm gonna vote for Allegra's coworking point because I think it's really interesting how the attitudes to co working from businesses that own their own premises is going to probably change and how they're going to consider that being an option or at least part of the mix for what they offer their staff in terms of working situations. So I'm going to vote for that one. I really love place of Maze points. I think they're both really, really important. I think the sense of creativity and thinking differently and enabling different voices into that mix is so incredibly important and I think we need that. And then in the part, if we'd if we're talking about what's actually happening, I think the cons cities has been something we've needed in this country for a really, really long time, or so I feel like. You're creativity point as my really aspirational what it wants to happen one and then the cities, I feel, is more practically likely. Yeah, both of mine. I didn't hey, you didn't know. I wanted to write it from my too as well, because I think they I think they're less concentration cities encompasses some of the other things we've been talking about and the creativity does as well. I think they're just the trends that we're going to see and also I think that people that lived through the it are going to like those are the trends that they're going to be going towards. So not concentrating in cities so much. It's just going to come with the natural thing, I think, and remembering that we're all creative as well, because we've all been through this time. So, Mo you have won this week. A Yay. So we will be putting most two points to a social media polling situation. We get to vote for the one that you most agree with or you think is most likely. I'm going to take all of that information, we're going to plug it into future podcast episodes and series and blog content and we're going to talk to people about all of these predictions that we've been having and chatting through and hopefully produce some really helpful content for everybody to get stuck into. I really hope everybody's enjoyed it. We shall have. If you have any suggestions or any thoughts on things that we can discuss and explore together, or suggestions for guests, get in touch with us. You can go to...

...watch this space dot UK and get in touch with us through there, or you can definitely find us on all social channels at watch this sp see and thank you very much, gals, but joining me for a ful chat. Thanks right. Hi,.

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